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Paradise regained—on the Orange Carpet

Picture angels talking to you in a garden paradise, explaining the origin of the world and your place in it. This isn’t heaven; it’s Cornell College—and the Orange Carpet to be more specific. And those angels—and devils—are students, faculty, and staff, gathered to read John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” aloud in one marathon session.

They read for hours, starting at 10 a.m. and going on into the evening. They read in the voice of God (provided at one point by physics Professor Lyle Lichty), Adam, Eve, Satan, and the whole heavenly—and hellish—host. This being a 21st century class, they even had a hashtag: #sexyserpent2013.

Professors Shannon Reed (left, English and creative writing) and Janeve West (right, theatre) read from “Paradise Lost,” reciting the argument between Lucifer and Abdiel.

Professors Shannon Reed (left, English and creative writing) and Janeve West (right, theatre) read from “Paradise Lost,” reciting the argument between Lucifer and Abdiel.

“Cornell College has been a fantastic place for me to enjoy the best Iowa has to offer without compromising a world-class liberal arts education. Cornell provides a unique environment for students to learn, by combining the small town Iowa community of Mount Vernon with the vast diversity of the student body. Cornell gives students the very best of both Iowa and the rest of the world. I love being a Cornell student because it gives me the opportunities of a much larger school, yet still remains intimate and personal without compromising on liberal-arts ideas. And it’s close to home.” —Logan Schultz ’14 Dubuque, Iowa

Telling the story of Cornell

Cornell College alumni are among the college’s most passionate and effective advocates. Their experiences provide powerful stories to communicate the value of a Cornell education.

Civil rights activists assemble on the stairs of the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, Montgomery, Ala., where the Montgomery Bus Boycott was organized in 1955-1956. John Watson ’68 is at center. Roger Davis ’65

The March for Freedom

It was March 1965 and news of brutal attacks on civil rights marchers from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., hit the Cornell campus. A small group of students quickly coalesced to drive down and join the reinforcements.